Pakistan Discussion's Forum

Pakistan Discussion's Forum

by mazhar.dk


See you in Muzafar Garh Catastrophe Medicine in Action

Health MagazinePosted by Dr. Iqbal A. Khan Wed, August 11, 2010 10:50:41
See you in Muzafar Garh Catastrophe Medidicine in Action

This artcle may motivate, young Pakistani Doctors, nurses and other health Personal to do some thing for our cour pakistanis in need. I wiil be travelling to Muzaffar Garh soon with three tons emengency mrdicine from Europe. See you there……….Dr.iqbal

The Institute of Medicine’s Forum on Medical and Public Health Preparedness for Catastrophic Events serves to foster dialogue among stakeholders and provide ongoing opportunities to discuss and confront issues of mutual interest and concern. In Muslim Countries of Middle East & In Pakistan, there is no well organised system to help Children elderly people. In Europe Study Circle “ Ilmo-Amal” has organised 200 Doctors, Nurses and Paramedicis. Dr. Iqbal MD arranges courses in England, Spain, and in Canada every year for learning people how to help specially children and elderly people. The Forum provides a neutral venue for broad ranging policy discussions that serve to facilitate coordination and cooperation among the public and private stakeholders in developing and enhancing the nation’s medical and public health preparedness. More specifically, the Forum: provides a catalyst for voluntary public/private collaboration on topics where there is synergy among potential partners; helps define the scope of the field and thus sets the stage for future policy action; brings ongoing attention and visibility to important preparedness issues; explores new approaches for resolving problem areas; and elevates the general understanding and visibility of medical and public health preparedness in the broader research, public policy, and other appropriate communities.

The Forum is self-governing, i.e., the Forum membership identifies the topics that it wishes to address, and with assistance from staff, develops meeting agendas and identifies workshop topics. As a result, topics span a broad range of issues in research, policy, and practice. Initial attention is being given to the following broad topic areas: medical surge capacity, disaster preparedness training, communication and distribution, psychological and community resilience, and research and evaluation.If you want to participate then Please contact : Doctoriqbal@hotmail.com


Small children and Pregnent Women have very physical traumatic situation in and around Sawat. .Dehydration & malneutration is effecting them very much.Childrens growth has been badly affected . Children are loosing salts and minerals through diarhea Non-Provocative aborts has been reported in refugees camp. This make pregnent in dangerous situation. male doctors are not allow in sawat valley to check women patient We do need some lady doctors from Muslim countries to come forward. We need them for field work ..
Health care professionals and emergency preparedness planners need training to care for the specific needs of older persons during times of disaster.Center on Aging is one of six geriatric centers across the nation selected by the Health and Human Services to provide elder disaster care training for frontline caregivers including geriatricians and rehabilitation specialists. This Geriatric Emergency Preparedness and Response training prepares them to respond to the needs of frail elders during a disaster, whether it is natural in origin or human-caused.
Elderly persons who are frail are particularly vulnerable to harm because they lack the lower limb strength to perform simple tasks such as getting out of a chair quickly or without assistance. About half of those over the age of 85 in nursing homes suffer from some sort of cognitive impairment, and may have trouble following instructions and understanding what is happening around them.
"Not enough health care professionals and emergency planners fully appreciate this increased vulnerability from certain age-related changes," said Roush, who is also the chair of the Association of Schools of Public Health and Centers for Disease Control Vulnerable Populations Collaboration Group on Frail Elders, a committee created to write guidelines for training programs.According to Roush, disaster stress is a normal response to abnormal events.The exposure level and proximity to a disaster determine behavioral changes such as fear of darkness, agitation and sleep disruption.
For some elders, post-traumatic stress disorder can manifest six to 18 months after the incident. Because of this, health care providers should offer psychological first aid to help affected elders feel safe again. It is important to immediately connect to restorative resources such as ensuring safe shelter, food and potable drinking water.
Emergency preparedness planners should also know what to expect. The curriculum developed by Roush and his colleagues shows them how to make evacuation areas such as school gymnasiums more accommodating to the needs of older persons – e.g., cots that are higher off the floor than usual to accommodate ease of getting onto and rising off them, adequate lighting and signs with larger print for night time trips to bathrooms, calendars and clocks for orientation to date and time. Pets, dentures and medications are three things that cannot be forgotten during an evacuation since many will not leave their homes without these items. And the consideration of "sheltering in place" vs.. evacuation is emphasized as the first important decision to be made."We have to take an all-hazards approach and assume the worst case scenario," said Roush.Adopting the pre-event mode mindset prepares caregivers for a disaster, and debriefing after a disaster allows for improved care during future events
Emergencies could be catastrophic for elders without plan
Health care professionals and emergency preparedness planners need training to care for the specific needs of older persons during times of disaster.Center on Aging is one of six geriatric centers across the nation selected by the Health and Human Services to provide elder disaster care training for frontline caregivers including geriatricians and rehabilitation specialists. This Geriatric In Vest ,Emergency Preparedness and Response training prepares them to respond to the needs of frail elders during a disaster, whether it is natural in origin or human-caused.

Emergencies could be catastrophic for elders without plan
Health care professionals and emergency preparedness planners need training to care for the specific needs of older persons during times of disaster.Center on Aging is one of six geriatric centers across the nation selected by the Health and Human Services to provide elder disaster care training for frontline caregivers including geriatricians and rehabilitation specialists. This Geriatric Emergency Preparedness and Response training prepares them to respond to the needs of frail elders during a disaster, whether it is natural in origin or human-caused.
Elderly persons who are frail are particularly vulnerable to harm because they lack the lower limb strength to perform simple tasks such as getting out of a chair quickly or without assistance. About half of those over the age of 85 in nursing homes suffer from some sort of cognitive impairment, and may have trouble following instructions and understanding what is happening around them.
"Not enough health care professionals and emergency planners fully appreciate this increased vulnerability from certain age-related changes," said Roush, who is also the chair of the Association of Schools of Public Health and Centers for Disease Control Vulnerable Populations Collaboration Group on Frail Elders, a committee created to write guidelines for training programs.According to Roush, disaster stress is a normal response to abnormal events.The exposure level and proximity to a disaster determine behavioral changes such as fear of darkness, agitation and sleep disruption.
For some elders, post-traumatic stress disorder can manifest six to 18 months after the incident. Because of this, health care providers should offer psychological first aid to help affected elders feel safe again. It is important to immediately connect to restorative resources such as ensuring safe shelter, food and potable drinking water.
Emergency preparedness planners should also know what to expect. The curriculum developed by Roush and his colleagues shows them how to make evacuation areas such as school gymnasiums more accommodating to the needs of older persons – e.g., cots that are higher off the floor than usual to accommodate ease of getting onto and rising off them, adequate lighting and signs with larger print for night time trips to bathrooms, calendars and clocks for orientation to date and time. Pets, dentures and medications are three things that cannot be forgotten during an evacuation since many will not leave their homes without these items. And the consideration of "sheltering in place" vs.. evacuation is emphasized as the first important decision to be made."We have to take an all-hazards approach and assume the worst case scenario," said Roush.Adopting the pre-event mode mindset prepares caregivers for a disaster, and debriefing after a disaster allows for improved care during future events.


Early response key in caring for disabled during disasters
Essential lessons learned during the response to eart quaks/Hurricanes included the need for physical medicine and rehabilitation professionals as early responders and the importance of promoting patient advocacy, say experts in a report that appears in the Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation.
"Physicians have had the feeling that rehabilitation services aren't needed until two to three weeks after a disaster hits, but we should be one of the first specialties on the scene," says Dr. Faye Chou Tan, associate professor of physical medicine and rehabilitation at BCM and lead author of the study. "We found that more people than previously thought needed rehabilitative care within the first week of arriving at the Astrodome."
The physically disabled are at a further disadvantage during disasters because of the underestimation of disability-specific supplies, medications and medical equipment such as wheelchairs.
The majority of the evacuees from the catastrophic area who were treated for rehabilitative conditions at the Astrodome were middle-aged and suffered most frequently from swollen feet and legs, leg pain and cramps, headaches and neck and back pain.
The study helped physicians identify which conditions were the most common and what supplies could be collected in advance in preparation for future disasters.
Preparing disabled patients to advocate for themselves during a disaster is also crucial, said Dr. Donna Bloodworth, associate professor of physical medicine and rehabilitation at BCM and co-author of the study.
"Patients should be aware of their diagnoses, what medications they are taking and how to contact their doctor," she said.
Those with special health care needs can dial 2-1-1 if they are in an evacuation zone during a disaster and need transportation to a shelter.
Bloodworth said physicians should speak to disabled patients each year about their medications. Patients should ask their doctors about early prescription refills if they are anticipating a disaster, and have a week's worth of supplies when evacuating.
Both study authors were able to apply lessons learned at the Astrodome within weeks when Hurricane Rita was set to hit Houston. They ensured that their patients evacuated with refills and all necessary information and now have a call schedule ready for the future.
Tan and Bloodworth recommend that healthcare providers be ready to hit the ground running during a disaster. "All physicians' skills are invaluable during a disaster," says Bloodworth.

……………..Pakistan Zindabad…………………..

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